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Texas Teachers and TIA

Texas Teachers and TIA

Benefiting Texas Teachers

The Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA) gives teachers an accessible pathway to earning a higher income while remaining in the classroom, allowing them to make a greater difference in the lives of Texas students. TIA elevates the teaching profession and allows districts to celebrate their top performing teachers with compensation and recognition through teacher designations.

Not a Grant

Teachers do not apply for TIA. Unlike previous education programs, the Teacher Incentive Allotments are additional state funding written into statute allowing for sustainable funding. There are no caps on teacher designations or allotment funds.

What are Teacher Designations?

Designations are distinctions awarded to highly effective teachers. TIA established three levels of designation: Recognized, Exemplary, and Master. Designations are awarded to teachers either through their district’s local designation system or by achieving National Board Certification. A local designation system can designate teachers at any level. Teachers with an active National Board certification may be designated as Recognized be the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

Once a teacher is designated, they may generate an annual allotment for their employing school district based on their campus of employment.

What are Teacher Designations?

Designations are distinctions awarded to highly effective teachers. TIA established three levels of designation: Recognized, Exemplary, and Master. Designations are awarded to teachers either through their district’s local designation system or by achieving National Board Certification. A local designation system can designate teachers at any level. Teachers with an active National Board certification may be designated as Recognized be the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

Once a teacher is designated, they may generate an annual allotment for their employing school district based on their campus of employment.

Becoming a Designated Teacher

Districts have the option to build a local designation system to designate teachers as Recognized, Exemplary, or Master. Before applying for a local designation system, districts develop evaluation criteria based on teacher observation and student growth data to identify their most effective teachers. A local designation system must be approved by TEA before the district can issue designations. This requires a two-step application and approval process.

While TEA places no restrictions on which teaching assignments are eligible for designations, building a local designation system is complex, and each district has their own unique needs. Districts implementing a local designation system may choose to start with specific campuses, subject areas, and/or grade levels. Many districts begin their system with a subset of teaching assignments, and expand their system to include most or all teaching assignments in subsequent years.

Districts with approved systems may submit teachers for designation each fall using appraisal data from the previous year. The teacher must remain employed in a teaching role with the designating district to be awarded the designation in the spring. Teachers who leave a district before earning a designation will not qualify.

For more information about your district’s plans for a local designation system, please reach out to your district’s administration.

Application and Approval of Local Teacher Designation System

The process of building a local designation system for TIA can take up to 3 years and is not always a clear linear path. Some districts may submit their System Application in Year 1 and begin the process of expanding or modifying their system from year 2 on.

 YEAR 0

Pre-

Application

District develops their local designation system.

YEAR 1

System

Application

Submission

District submits their application based on their local designation system plans. If approved, is given Local Designation System Application Accepted status.

YEAR 2

Data Capture

Year

District implements their system and captures SGM and TO data throughout the year.

YEAR 3

Data

Submission

District submits data for validation and if approved is given Local Designation System Approved status. Designations are awarded and allotments generated.

YEAR 4

Post-Approval

District may submit new or higher designations for approval for up to 5 years.

National Board Certification is a voluntary, advanced professional certification for Pre-K-12 educators that identifies teaching expertise through a performance-based, peer-reviewed assessment. Teachers are certified based on standards set by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) NBPTS requires three years of experience as a certified teacher before registering as a candidate for National Board certification. Some exceptions may apply.

Classroom teachers who achieve National Board certifications may be designated as Recognized, even if their district does not have a local designation system. The designation will be awarded in the same school year in which they achieved National Board certification. National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) must be listed in the NBCT DIRECTORY as a Texas teacher and have an active National Board certificate to be eligible for TIA.

Any Texas teacher may earn a designation through an approved local designation system if they meet the district’s criteria. With the passage of HB1525 in the 87th Regular Session, uncertified teachers are also eligible to earn designations in any Texas district.

Designations are not tied to a particular subject area, grade level, or certification. Designated teachers may change teaching assignments with no impact on their designation status.

Designations are awarded annually in the spring. Before awarding a designation, TEA will verify that the teacher was employed in a teaching position as of the last Friday in February. For teachers earning a designation through a district system, TEA will also verify that they were employed in a teaching role for a
creditable year of service*A creditable year of service is defined as employed and compensated by a Texas school system in a teacher role for at least 90 days at 100% of the day or 180 days at 50-99% of the day.
with the designating district.

Teachers are eligible to earn a designation through a local designation system if they meet the following criteria:

Employed by the recommending district in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS).

Employed by the recommending district in a teacherrole (087 role ID in PEIMS) for at least 90 days at 100% of the day or 180 days at 50-99% of the day.

Not currently designated by a local designation system unless being recommended for a higher designation or in the last year of a teacher designation.

National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) are eligible to earn a designation if they meet the following criteria:

Hold an active National Board certification.

NBCT directory listing reflects Texas residency and/or employment.

Reported by the above Texas school system in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS) during that year’s Class Roster Winter Submission in February.

Designations issued through a local designation system are valid for five years. Once the designation expires, the teacher may be issued a new designation if they continue to work in a district with an approved designation system and meet the district’s performance criteria.

Designations for NBCTs expire in the summer following expiration of the National Board certificate. If an NBCT renews or maintains their certificate, TEA will adjust the designation expiry date accordingly.

Teachers may only have one active designation at a time. Designated teachers working in a district with a local designation system may be put forth for a higher designation within the five-year window if they meet the district’s performance criteria. In these cases, the higher designation will replace the lower designation, and the five-year clock will re-start. Teachers may not be put forth by a district for a lower or equal designation.

NBCTs may also earn a designation through their district’s local designation system. If they earn a higher designation, the higher designation will take precedence, and the Recognized designation will become inactive. If they are put forth for a Recognized designation, the designation will default to the later expiry date.

All designated teachers, including National Board Certified, are eligible to generate an allotment for their district if they meet the following criteria:

Employed and compensated by a Texas school system in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS) for at least 90 days at 100% of the day or 180 days at 50-99% of the day.

Reported by the above Texas school system in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS) during that year’s Class Roster Winter Submission in February.

Any Texas teacher may earn a designation through an approved local designation system if they meet the district’s criteria. With the passage of HB1525 in the 87th Regular Session, uncertified teachers are also eligible to earn designations in any Texas district.

Designations are not tied to a particular subject area, grade level, or certification. Designated teachers may change teaching assignments with no impact on their designation status.

Designations are awarded annually in the spring. Before awarding a designation, TEA will verify that the teacher was employed in a teaching position as of the last Friday in February. For teachers earning a designation through a district system, TEA will also verify that they were employed in a teaching role for a
creditable year of service*A creditable year of service is defined as employed and compensated by a Texas school system in a teacher role for at least 90 days at 100% of the day or 180 days at 50-99% of the day.
with the designating district.

Teachers are eligible to earn a designation through a local designation system if they meet the following criteria:

Employed by the recommending district in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS).

Employed by the recommending district in a teacherrole (087 role ID in PEIMS) for at least 90 days at 100% of the day or 180 days at 50-99% of the day.

Not currently designated by a local designation system unless being recommended for a higher designation or in the last year of a teacher designation.

National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) are eligible to earn a designation if they meet the following criteria:

Hold an active National Board certification.

NBCT directory listing reflects Texas residency and/or employment.

Reported by the above Texas school system in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS) during that year’s Class Roster Winter Submission in February.

Designations issued through a local designation system are valid for five years. Once the designation expires, the teacher may be issued a new designation if they continue to work in a district with an approved designation system and meet the district’s performance criteria.

Designations for NBCTs expire in the summer following expiration of the National Board certificate. If an NBCT renews or maintains their certificate, TEA will adjust the designation expiry date accordingly.

Teachers may only have one active designation at a time. Designated teachers working in a district with a local designation system may be put forth for a higher designation within the five-year window if they meet the district’s performance criteria. In these cases, the higher designation will replace the lower designation, and the five-year clock will re-start. Teachers may not be put forth by a district for a lower or equal designation.

NBCTs may also earn a designation through their district’s local designation system. If they earn a higher designation, the higher designation will take precedence, and the Recognized designation will become inactive. If they are put forth for a Recognized designation, the designation will default to the later expiry date.

All designated teachers, including National Board Certified, are eligible to generate an allotment for their district if they meet the following criteria:

Employed and compensated by a Texas school system in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS) for at least 90 days at 100% of the day or 180 days at 50-99% of the day.

Reported by the above Texas school system in a teacher role (087 role ID in PEIMS) during that year’s Class Roster Winter Submission in February.

How Funding is Distributed

TEA verifies allotment eligibility annually using data reported by districts in the Class Roster Winter Submission. Designated teachers who continue to be employed as a teacher for a creditable year of service will generate an allotment for their employing district. The annual allotment value is determined by their campus(es) of employment on the last Friday in February. Allotments are not prorated.

The Texas Education Agency confirms eligibility and campus placement of designated teachers in April. Once placement is confirmed, districts will verify and confirm their allotment with TEA. TEA will notify teachers in late May of the allotment generated for their employing districts. Districts then have until August 31 to spend their funds.

Districts are required to spend 90% or more of the annual funds on teacher compensation on the campus where the designated teacher worked.

The remaining 10% may be used for costs associated with implementing a local designation system or supporting teachers in getting designated. Districts create their own spending plans based on local needs; the percentage awarded to the designated teacher will vary by school district. Some districts award TIA compensation through single or multiple stipends, whereas other districts incorporate TIA funds into an elevated salary schedule for designated teachers.

The amount of funding the designated teacher earns will vary by campus based on their designation, the socioeconomic needs at a campus, the rural status of a campus, and the spending plan created by the district. Designated teachers are encouraged to reach out to their campus or district administration to learn how they plan to spend funding from the Teacher Incentive Allotment.

Stipend Example 1

District pays stipends only to designated teachers equal to the amount generated by each designated teacher

Designated Teacher

The stipends are paid in one lump
sum in August

$4,500

$9,000

$18,000

Designated Teacher

The stipends are paid in one lumpsum in August

$4,500

The stipends are paid in one lumpsum in August

$9,000

The stipends are paid in one lumpsum in August

$18,000

Stipend Example 2

Districts adopt a stipend plan that provides multiple awards over the course of the school year. Payment 1 and Payment 2 must be completed by August 31.

Designated Teacher

Payment Schedule
Total Stipend Amount

$4,500

$9,000

$18,000

Payment 1

Payment 2

$1,500

$3,000

$3,000

$6,000

$6,000

$12,000

Designated Teacher

Payment Schedule
Total Stipend Amount

Payment 1

Payment 2

$4,500

$1,500

$3,000

Payment Schedule
Total Stipend Amount

Payment 1

Payment 2

$9,000

$3,000

$6,000

Payment Schedule
Total Stipend Amount

Payment 1

Payment 2

$18,000

$6,000

$12,000

Reworked Salary Schedule Example 1

District pays an annual raise only to designated teachers based on the amount generated by each designated teacher. In this district, which uses a teacher salary schedule, the raises for designated teachers were added by adding lanes to the schedule.

Reworked Salary Schedule Example 1

District pays an annual raise only to designated teachers based on the amount generated by each designated teacher. In this district, which uses a teacher salary schedule, the raises for designated teachers were added by adding lanes to the schedule.

Reworked Salary Schedule Example 2

District creates a teacher salary schedule with the extra salary costs paid primarily by TIA allotments. This plan also provides stipends to certain eligible certified teachers. The stipends are paid in four equal payments.

Reworked Salary Schedule Example 2

District creates a teacher salary schedule with the extra salary costs paid primarily by TIA allotments. This plan also provides stipends to certain eligible certified teachers. The stipends are paid in four equal payments.

Designated Teachers Moving Districts

While allotment funding generated from a teacher’s designation goes to the district where the teacher worked in late February, the designation will remain with the designated teacher until it expires. Allotments are recalculated annually, and funding may be awarded to a new district the following year if a teacher moves. However, the time a teacher moves is paramount to determining which district will receive funds.

If a teacher moves districts prior to the snapshot date in late February and works a creditable year of service with the new district, then the new district will be awarded the funds.

If the designated teacher leaves after the snapshot date, and worked a creditable year of service prior to leaving, then the previous district will receive the funds.

If a teacher moves districts prior to the snapshot date in late February and works a creditable year of service with the new district, then the new district will be awarded the funds.

If the designated teacher leaves after the snapshot date, and worked a creditable year of service prior to leaving, then the previous district will receive the funds.

Districts may choose whether to forward funds to designated teachers who leave the district prior to the August 31 spending deadline. This will depend on the district’s local spending plan. Designated teachers are encouraged to reach out to their district prior to moving to determine if they will still receive allotment funds. If the district chooses not to forward allotment funds, the district must still spend at least 90% on teacher compensation on the campus where the designated teacher worked.

Movement of Teachers

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